Venison Casserole and Celeriac Mash

Venison Stew EdinburghCook Style

  • Servings: 4-5
  • Difficulty: easy
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A lonesome Aubergine in the fridge, and the ask to use it up as part of tea….oh and what we going to do with the Celeriac that came in the veg box set the brain going for this one. A chill in the air dictates comfort food, a hearty stew something to warm the soul and sits alongside a mash. A recipe to make your own depending on your butchers counter, the mood you're in and your preference for red meat. I had planned to make this a Lamb stew until I saw the Venison on the counter, lean and gamey calling out to be cooked for a change.

Credit: The Edinburgh Cook Recipe File

Prep:  This easily covers 4  portions, and can be upsized.   I used a small le creuset, a heavy based casserole dish that transfers from the hob to the oven.

For note this cooks easily alongside a rice pudding for afters…. A real comfort eating night.

Ingredients

Venison Stew

  • 3 tbsp Olive or Rapeseed oil
  • 500g Stewing Venison
  • 1 Onions, finely chopped
  • A glass of red wine or port
  • 1 stock cube
  • 100g Brown Lentils
  • 1 aubergine, diced into bite sized pieces
  • 1 courgette, diced into bite sized pieces
  • 1 400g tin of chopped tomatoes
  • 150g mushrooms, quartered
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander

Celeriac Mash

  • 1 Celeriac (600g or so after peeling)
  • Potatoes (400g or so)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 2 Bay Leaves
  • 50g butter
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp Grain Mustard
  • A handful of parsley leaves chopped finely

Directions

  • Heat a tablespoon of the oil
  • Brown the venison in batches without over crowding in the pan, 2 or three batches should suffice.  Add more oil if needed
  • Deglaze the bottom of the pan using the wine and a wooden spoon to get any crispy bits off.  Then pour these juices into a jug or over the venison if you have the venison  in a bowl
  • Another glug of oil, and soften the diced onion
  • Stir in the spices
  • Stir in the Aubergine and Courgette cooking through for a minute or so
  • Add the tin of the tomatoes and then the stock cube made up with water using the tin of the tomatoes
  • Add the mushrooms and stir through
  • Add the Venison and juices, bring to a simmer then place in the oven for an hour and a half or so
  • At this point I stir in the lentils, use your judgement, how runny is it?  The lentils are there to thicken up the casserole so your choice on how runny you like your stew.  Place back in the oven, after a stir through

30-40 minutes before your going to eat the stew, prep your Celeriac and Potatoes

  • Trim all the muddy roots and peel, dice into chunks, place in a pan of water to cover
  • Add the lemon juice to stop any discolour
  • Peel and dice the potatoes to a similar size, adding to the pan
  • Add the salt, bay leaves and bring to a simmer fo 25 minutes, or until the potatoes are soft
  • Drain the water
  • Add the butter, mustard and parsley and using a masher put some muscle into working it all through

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Roast Fillet of Fish


Roast White Fish

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy - faith and stick to the timings
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Avoided the Saturday queue by popping into the fish shop on my way home from work on the Friday. The downside being the remains of the day. As a result I discovered and cooked Silver Hake for the first time.

I share this recipe more an aid memoir to myself, part of the recipes for life file. I tend to forget whether the skin goes down first or last and as I write this it feels obvious…..but I swear I forget time and time again.   Pan fry the flesh first before turning onto the skin and placing into the oven.   This gives the fish a lovely colour on top for serving and the Skin protects the rest of the fish whilst in the oven as it cooks through.

Credit: A nod to Nigel Slater and his Kitchen Diaries

Advice: Heat and timing key for this, if your serving with a salad get that done up front. Both a hob and ovenproof pan is needed.

Ingredients

  • 200g chunky fillet of fish with skin on
  • Knob of butter, or a tblsp or so of olive oil

Directions

  1. Crank up the oven, 220°C
  2. In the oven proof pan, bring the oil to a high heat on the hob
  3. Whilst your bringing the heat up, season the fish with salt and pepper
  4. Skin Side up if the key. Place the fish into the pan and fry for a few minutes until starting to turn golden
  5. Turn over onto the skin and then place the pan into the hot oven
  6. Depending on the fish it will take 7-10 mins.       I set the timer for 7 mins…easier to cook for a few minutes more than it is to roll back the clock if it’s over cooked.

Bolognese – Authentic Edinburgh Cook Style

Bolognese EdinburghCook Style

  • Servings: 12
  • Difficulty: easy
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Bolognese

Bolognese when I was a boy came from a Colman’s packet, a dry substance that was mixed with hot water and mince that had been browned for 5 minutes or so served with a bland starchy spaghetti. My sister and I desperately trying to convince my dad that it would be great idea, worth a change and add some variety to our menu. I can’t remember how we convinced him, but we did and it was horrible! Maybe it was us, we weren’t cooks, the sauce I remember was so watery and tasteless, we put a brave face on and made out it was great! We didn’t get to try again, probably a good thing!

As a student I moved onto jars of Dolmio probably buy 1 get 1 free and then later after graduation more sophisticated jars of pasta sauce with bake in the oven magic skills. At some point though I became aware that these jars came with sugar, salt and all manner of preservatives. I’m pretty sure they came with the word authentic across the label, or just like mama used to make. Somehow I became aware that all that was really needed was a tin of good quality tomatoes, some seasoning, good mince and some slow cook time.

I’ve come across many variations of a Bolognese recipe all claiming to be authentic and I’ve tried a few of them, hoping to come across the secret sauce, the be all and end all of all Bolognese recipes to end them all. I’ve come to realise that the authentic Bolognese is your own recipe…the one that works for you and your family.

Mine, I adapt for the mood, it’s always made with view of having enough to freeze, use up the onions and the carrots from the veg box, even the odd chilli and then I add kidney beans as well…..please don’t shoot me….I know it’s not traditional authentic…..it works for us though! I hope you get something from my recipe!


Credit: The Edinburgh Cook Recipe File
Prep: This roughly covers 12 portions, we get 3 meals for 4 in terms of freezer prep. Good sized casserole dish, heavy based pan.

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp Olive oil
  • 100g pancetta or bacon (I use ham ends from the butcher), diced
  • 2 Onions, finely chopped
  • 2 Cloves garlic
  • 2-3 carrots, finely chopped
  • 2 celery stalk, finely chopped
  • 1kg mince (Our butcher now does minced pork, so I use 500g of pork and 500g beef)
  • 1 tblsp dried oregano
  • 300ml red wine (could use white)
  • 2 tbsp tomato purée
  • 400g tin of chopped tomatoes
  • 100g split red lentils (controversial! Optional)
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 150ml whole milk

To serve, up until recently we were big fans of Spaghetti or Fusilli. My recent discovery being that Spaghetti is a British/American take on the dish. More traditional would be Tagliatelle or Pappardelle and mixed into the pasta rather than served on top in a big dollop.

Goes without saying freshly grated parmesan adds that true authentic taste!

Directions

  1. Heat the oil, and gently brown the bacon
  2. With the heat at a gentle setting, add the veg to this and soften the onions, garlic, carrots and celery with the idea of creating a Soffrito, a soft base of veg
  3. At this point I tip this into a bowl and put to a side….just so I can really get stuck in with the meat. You can crumble the mince straight into the pan if you like.
  4. Turn the heat up slightly and using a wooden spoon break the mince down, browning it as you go. The mince needs to have lost all its colour.
  5. Once browned throw the veg back in if you went for the separate bowl option.
  6. Add the Oregano, stir through.
  7. Add a pinch of salt and a grinding of black pepper
  8. Add the Wine and stir through, bring to a simmer.
  9. Add the tomatoes and the purée, stir through and bring to a simmer then lower the heat and pop the lid on for an 1hr 30mins. You just want the ragu to talk to itself for an hour so. Keep an eye on it…I like to nurture it.
  10. At this point I stir in the milk….some people add a bit of dark chocolate. The milk adds a subtle creaminess that I like
  11. At this point I gage whether it’s too runny and add the lentils in, simmer and stir for 30 mins. This both soaks up the liquid at the same time as bulking out the meal for the boys who just seem to be eating more and more! You could just take the lid off and simmer slowly for 30 mins to thicken up